The Glen Cinema Memorial Artwork

The Glen Cinema Memorial Artwork

We won’t use this blog to describe what happened inside the Glen Cinema, Paisley on Hogmanay 1929 – it is well documented online, in history books, and in the memories of the people of Renfrewshire and across the world. Instead we are using this blog as an opportunity to describe some of what we have learnt and experienced over the past two years while working on this project. (more…)

COP26 – A Paddle into Podcasts

COP26 – A Paddle into Podcasts

The delayed COP26 summit is to begin on the last day of October, amid the road closures and the rail strikes, the challenges of social distancing and – perhaps – of Scottish weather in autumn, over 30,000 attendees representing over 200 countries, businesses, NGOs and other groups will meet and attempt to advance the aims of the Paris Agreement and the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. (more…)

Recovery, Repair, Renewal: Conference Video

Recovery, Repair, Renewal: Conference Video

At the beginning of June, CCSE had the perhaps slightly unexpected pleasure of one again hosting our annual conference virtually. As CCSE Director – Prof Gayle McPherson – pointed out in her opening remarks; at the time of our first virtual outing in May last year, there were few among us who believed we’d be gearing up for a second digital event just over twelve months later.

Home offices, dining, kitchen and side tables served as our venue once again and everyone bore responsibility for their own tea and biscuits. While far from the traditional conference offering, it is potentially the case that the widespread development of digital – and in future hybrid – events will be one of the longterm legacies of the pandemic response, ultimately enabling greater engagement with a wider audience. (more…)

Illuminating a Dark Theatre: Arts, Community, COVID19, Theatre, Cultural Heritage, Culture, Digital

Illuminating a Dark Theatre: Arts, Community, COVID19, Theatre, Cultural Heritage, Culture, Digital

On September 1939, at the start of the start of World War II, the government ordered the closure of all theatres throughout Britain, fearing that large congregations of people would be susceptible to aerial bombardment.  It was quickly realised that theatres were vital to the morale and wellbeing of the general public and The Gaiety Theatre, Ayr  was the first in Britain to open its doors providing welcome entertainment to the public and troops stationed locally. (more…)

Recovery, Repair & Renewal: The role of arts and culture in the future of urban places

Recovery, Repair & Renewal: The role of arts and culture in the future of urban places

The Centre for Culture, Sport & Events is delighted to invite you to our virtual annual conference. The event ‘Recovery, Repair & Renewal: The role of arts and culture in the future of urban places’ will take place on Wednesday 9th June 2021.

The Centre for Culture, Sport and Events, CCSE, undertakes research, consultation and knowledge exchange work aligned with our four key themes:

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Post-Pandemic: The Cockroaches of the Cultural Sector

Post-Pandemic: The Cockroaches of the Cultural Sector

During the 1980’s and 90s, when social enterprise was an innovative concept in Scotland, Strathclyde Regional Council, Objective 3 Partnership and the Scottish Centre for Regeneration were surprised when Fablevision board members  thanked them for turning down applications for funding on the grounds that we were ‘not sustainable’.  Having funding bids rejected forced Fablevision artists, like most other creative practitioners, to develop other, entrepreneurial business models that would allow them to continue their practice without compromising their vision or values and we thanked them for forcing us to be independent. Over the ensuing decades, Fablevision inherited furniture from Strathclyde  Regional Council when they shut up shop; computer equipment from Objective 3 Partnership when they closed and co-created  learning materials on the demise of the Scottish Centre for Regeneration.  The ‘unsustainable’ small cultural social enterprise outlasted all the big beasts. Like other small cultural organisations, we were light on our feet – able to adapt and pivot creatively and meet the new requirements of whatever adverse social/economic/political circumstances presented. There is a joke in community based cultural practice that practitioners of these arts are like ‘cockroaches will be after the nuclear holocaust – they will be the only living things to survive’.    (more…)