CCSE, A Year in Review through the Lens of our Blog: part I

CCSE, A Year in Review through the Lens of our Blog: part I

The passage of time has been a somewhat strange – or at least, stranger – thing to experience in 2020 than is usually the case. It is nevertheless heartening to look back over the academic year through the lens of the posts that we’ve been able to publish on the CCSE blog. (more…)

Use or Ornament? Finding a Role & Relevance for Learning during Lockdown

Use or Ornament? Finding a Role & Relevance for Learning during Lockdown

I have been reading ‘Funny Weather – art in an emergency’ by Olivia Laing (almost required reading for out times) and was struck by her use of the word ‘hospitality’ in the introduction, in relation to what artists do and can do for us. It made me realise that I have been using the term very much in relation to welcoming people into a venue, as a one-way flow of hospitality. (more…)

Paisley’s Heart and Soul – A Short Film

Earlier in the year, CCSE staff got together with colleagues from STAR Project to deliver a workshop alongside STAR community members. The workshop was an opportunity to discuss community experiences of culture in and around Paisley and Renfrewshire. The workshop was part of our UKRI project, funded as part of their ‘Enchacing Place Based Parterships’ stream. (more…)

‘Stories from the Streets’: COVID-19 and (hyper) local collective responses

‘Stories from the Streets’: COVID-19 and (hyper) local collective responses

While formal, officially sanctioned social gatherings were banned during lockdown, more localised and creative responses to the restrictions associated with COVID-19 were evident, across the world. From the balcony concerts of Barcelona, to the socially distanced street parties celebrating VE Day in London and the neighbourhood DJ sets taking place in other cities, the everyday, communal and ‘hyper-local’ responses to COVID-19 of people in our urban locations was inspiring. (more…)

Edinburgh, A View from the Fringe

Edinburgh, A View from the Fringe

The Edinburgh Festival Fringe not taking place for the first time in its 73 year history was a huge professional and personal blow to the thousands of individuals and organisations who make up the festival.  The Fringe Society, the charity that underpins the infrastructure of the festival, faced an existential crisis as 85% of its income is earned through the festival.  (more…)