Foregrounding a Rights-Based Agenda for Sport Events

Foregrounding a Rights-Based Agenda for Sport Events

Hosted by the Centre for Culture, Sport & Events at UWS, Foregrounding a Rights-Based Agenda for Sport Events: Insights from Research and Practice, took place virtually on 20th June 2022. Colleagues from a variety of leading institutions gathered to discuss a number of questions arising from the rights agenda in mega sport events from a variety of research, governance, organisational and policy perspectives. This symposium was organised as part of the EU-funded EventRights project which includes a number of academic institutions from Europe, and further afield. (more…)

The Anniversary Of London 2012 Olympic Games – The Social Value Of Events?

The Anniversary Of London 2012 Olympic Games – The Social Value Of Events?

Our Spirit of London 2012 and Local Trust funded research project examining the social value of community events was completed at the end of last year. This week, I participated in a webinar alongside project collaborator Tamsin Cox. Chaired by Bill Morris, LVO, and, along with Amy Finch (Spirit of 2012), Gurvinder Sandher (Kent Equality Cohesion Council) and James Austin (The Jo Cox Foundation) it was a great opportunity to discuss and reflect upon the outputs we created as part of our commissioned work (the webinar was recorded and so will be available soon for further distribution). (more…)

Looking Back… to See How Far I’ve Come Already…

Looking Back… to See How Far I’ve Come Already…

The Scottish Graduate School for Arts & Humanities (SGSAH) and Scottish Graduate School of Social Science (SGSSS) have been invaluable to my PhD experience providing training in research approaches, methods, different ways of thinking about the world and technical training with courses on how to edit and write. I signed up for as many courses as I could fit in, as accessing any of these courses outside academia is difficult, costly, or nonexistent. (more…)

Out of the Office but not Working from Home…

Out of the Office but not Working from Home…

When working within social science in Scotland, it is perhaps particularly noticeable that opinions on relations with – and feelings towards – the UK tend to pop up quite regularly and, just about everywhere. Coming – as I do – from a nation (Sweden) whose history is shaped by the secessions of just about every neighbouring country, this intrigues me. In my mother tongue, it is not uncommon for people to speak of “England” when they mean the “UK.” This is especially common among Swedes who are above a certain age. (more…)

CCSE: A (half) Year in Review

CCSE: A (half) Year in Review

As the new academic year pick up pace, we find ourselves tentitively adjusting to something of a return to a more conventional office life. Albeit one in which venturing out in public my still result in failure to recognise someone you’ve known for years on account of only being able to see half of their face! Nevertheless, it is encouraging that we are able to look forward to some work taking place in ‘real life’ settings rather than in the ether. (more…)

The Olympic Games as a Weak Excuse

The Olympic Games as a Weak Excuse

The Aim of my research as a PhD student over the last two and half years has been to examine how the Japanese and Tokyo governments, through sports diplomacy, will use the Olympic Games as a soft power tool. The phrase ‘the Olympic Games as a Weak excuse’ stems from the data collection and coding process of my research to examine the effectiveness of Japans soft power strategy in using the Olympic Games as a soft power tool. The organisation of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games has been an incubator of narratives, an Olympic Games like no other. This is because of the Emergence of the Coronavirus (Covid-19) that led to a global pandemic, resulting in the postponement of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. (more…)