place-focused culturAL regeneration

This theme includes:

  • cultural participation and engagement
  • arts and health
  • cultural policy and regeneration
  • creative practice
  • socially embedded arts practice 
One of the principal activities of the CCSE is to undertake research and knowledge exchange activities focused on the importance of arts, culture and events to the development of places – in this case Paisley and the wider Renfrewshire area. Under the theme of place-focused cultural regeneration, the CCSE’s focus from 2018-2021 is to undertake research enquiries to assess the extent to which Paisley’s investment in arts, culture, heritage and events activity has produced intended outcomes – and what unintended outcomes have emerged. The CCSE will ensure that research and evaluation expertise are fundamental and embedded parts of Paisley’s approach to cultural regeneration.

Renfrewshire Council’s commitment to the establishment of the CCSE is driven in particular by the need to demonstrate the impact of cultural regeneration and to gain a better understanding of the effectiveness of a multi-disciplinary approach to achieving five step changes:

1. Grow a significant new dimension to Paisley’s economy;
2. Radically change Paisley’s image and reputation in Scotland, the UK and internationally;
3. Paisley will be recognised for its cultural excellence;
4. Lift Paisley’s communities out of poverty;
5. Transform Paisley into a vibrant cultural town centre.

Over £100m is being invested to transform Paisley culturally, physically, socially and economically. This investment includes a once-in-a-generation transformation of the town centre, including re-imagining Paisley Museum as a world-class destination, building a new Learning and Cultural Hub at the heart of the High Street and refurbishing the Town Hall so it becomes a landmark entertainment venue. This investment also extends beyond bricks and mortar into neighbourhoods and communities, aiming to take new approaches through the arts, heritage and culture to improving people’s health and wellbeing, raising educational attainment and contributing to inclusive economic growth. Paisley’s cultural regeneration is founded upon and being driven by a partnership approach. The Paisley Partnership led Paisley’s UK City of Culture bid and is now committed to building on this momentum to lead Paisley’s cultural renewal into the future. The Future Paisley Partnership Board includes leading organisations representing Paisley’s communities and businesses, culture and events, further and higher education, health and police. It is grounded in local knowledge and has a national and international reach and influence.
Two PhD studentships will be conducted through this theme. The first studentship will use participatory arts practices to investigate the impact of the arts on health in order to better understand the scope of cultural inclusion for improving health and wellbeing and reducing health inequalities. The doctoral student will be embedded within the NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde and the Paisley Partnership’s Culture, Arts and Social Care Network. The second studentship will be embedded within Renfrewshire Council’s Regeneration Service and will investigate, evidence and analyse the direct and indirect effects on Paisley’s local economy of cultural regeneration programmes and the stimulation of the local creative industries sector.

In this theme we also draw on Centre members’ long-term engagement in place-making through embedded research, conducted with disfranchised communities and concerning changes brought about, and intensified, by community voice, media, policy engagement, as well as co-curation with grassroots organizations and local cultural agents. Centre staff have extensive experience of outreach activity, knowledge and research exchange focused on arts-based methods and active citizenship with peripheral communities across Europe, (RSE Arts and Humanities Network Award Regeneration and Heritage Zones in Northern Europe: Interdisciplinary and Cross-Institutional Research Network, Creative Scotland funded Riverside Solidarity; in India Resources of Hope AHRC/GCRF, and in Brazil and Argentina. These projects established a working method based on long-term embedded participatory research-practice in place-making – a multi-stakeholder and cross-institutional platform for co-production of knowledge.

Blogs on this theme: 

Use or Ornament? Finding a Role & Relevance for Learning during Lockdown

This week's guest blog comes from Sarah Derrick, Head of Learning at Dundee Contemporary Arts I have been reading ‘Funny Weather – art in an emergency’ by Olivia Laing (almost required reading for out times) and was struck by her use of the word ‘hospitality’ in the...

Paisley’s Heart and Soul – A Short Film

Earlier in the year, CCSE staff got together with colleagues from STAR Project to deliver a workshop alongside STAR community members. The workshop was an opportunity to discuss community experiences of culture in and around Paisley and Renfrewshire. The workshop was...

‘Stories from the Streets’: COVID-19 and (hyper) local collective responses

While formal, officially sanctioned social gatherings were banned during lockdown, more localised and creative responses to the restrictions associated with COVID-19 were evident, across the world. From the balcony concerts of Barcelona, to the socially distanced...

Edinburgh, A View from the Fringe

The Edinburgh Festival Fringe not taking place for the first time in its 73 year history was a huge professional and personal blow to the thousands of individuals and organisations who make up the festival.  The Fringe Society, the charity that underpins the...

Commemorative Events and the COVID-19 Pandemic

FESTSPACE Co-Investigator, Dr Bernadette Quinn, recently published this article on the FESTSPACE webpage; it reappears here by kind permission. Being able to use public space is something we routinely take for granted. However, in recent months governments have...

CCSI 2020: 7th biennial International Symposium on Cross-Sector Social Interactions

After our own recent experience of hosting a virtual conference, CCSE Director - Prof Gayle McPherson - spoke this week at the 7th biennial International Symposium on Cross -Sector Social Interactions. As the restrictions on co-presence and travel remain in place for...

From Community Empowerment to Community Power – what COVID-19 is teaching us about the relationship between citizens, communities and the state

CCSE Steering Group Member, Pippa Coutts, recently published the following post as part of Carnegie UK Trust's series sharing reflections and questions across different aspects of wellbeing duing the COVID19 crisis. This post first appeared on the Carnigie UK Trust...

James Town & Slavery – Short Film

Dr Stephen Collins' short film 'James Town and Slavery' is an official selection for the Changing The Story Online International FIlm Festival. The film is a result of a research project which investigates the links between modern and historic slavery in James Town,...

Festivals, Events & the COVID-19 Pandemic

CCSE Deputy Director Professor David McGillivray has recently published the following blog post as part of the FESTSPACE project he leads discussing the impact and implications of COVID-19 on the festivals, events and public spaces that project is investigating. This...

Third Sector Chief Exec-ing during Covid-19

Seven weeks in… These are my reflections on working as a third sector / civil society Chief Executive during these bizarre, unsettled and challenging times. The last few weeks have been inspiring and stressful in equal measure. I wanted to try to capture and publish...